Middle East

AP Photo/Vahid Salemi

What Is Worse for Israel, Attacking or Not Attacking Iran’s Nuclear Infrastructure?

By Massimiliano Fiore

It is possible that at some point in the next 15-18 months Israel’s policy-makers and military officials will need to decide whether or not to attack Iran’s nuclear infrastructure. That would certainly be one of the most complicated decisions since the establishment of the State of Israel. What political considerations would influence it? And, what short-term strategic developments would be set in motion either by a nuclear-ready Iran or by an Israeli military strike against Iran’s nuclear installations?

AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti

Israeli Greater Jerusalem, An Obstacle to Peace?

By Andrea Dessi

In the forty-three years since Israel occupied and annexed East Jerusalem in June 1967 the cardinal principal guiding Israeli policy towards the city has been that of ensuring it never again be divided. 

AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici

Can Turkey Be a Source of Stability in the Middle East?

By Andrea Dessi

Over the past decade Turkey has considerably increased its involvement in Middle Eastern affairs. From the stabilization of Iraq and Afghanistan, to Lebanon’s troubled politics, Iran’s nuclear ambitions, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, world leaders are increasingly coming to terms with Turkey’s growing regional influence. While some view this Turkish “return” to the region with suspicion and unease; one must acknowledge that Turkey’s growing influence is being spearheaded mainly by the country’s soft-power. 

US Navy/Michael A. Blaha

Past the Eleventh Hour: US Withdrawal from Iraq

By Katherine Opoka

After eight months of political deadlock, the incumbent Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has been tasked with forming a new government in Iraq. The re-election of the Shiite leader has sparked fresh waves of scepticism internationally as his government’s ability to maintain security in the weakened Iraqi state has been questioned. Following the 7 March 2010 National Elections, the insurgency has persisted, once again threatening to ignite tensions and fuel sectarian conflict across Iraq. As Iraq enters the eleventh hour, what is the future of the fledgling state? 

AP Photo/Nader Daoud

Reform Needs to Boycott ... Boycott!

By Manar Rachwani

According to Jordan’s Minister of Political Development Musa Maaytah, the Islamic Movement of Jordan would have won at least 20 out of 120 seats of the Lower House of Parliament, if it had not decided to boycott elections. But from the point of view of the Islamic Movement such claims, although supported by the Jordanian Centre for Strategic Studies, have no foundations. 

AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner

Ghajar Divided Again

By Massimiliano Fiore

On 17 November, the residents of Ghajar, a divided village straddling the border between Lebanon and Israel, took to the streets to protest against the Israeli Security Cabinet’s approval of a plan to unilaterally withdraw the Israel Defence Force (IDF) from the northern half of the village. 

AP Photo/Leslie Mazoch

What Lurks Behind Iran’s Involvement in Latin America?

By Massimiliano Fiore

Since President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s election in 2005, Iran has been promoting an aggressive policy aimed at expanding its diplomatic and economic influence across Latin America.