Security

AP Photo/Vahid Salemi

What Is Worse for Israel, Attacking or Not Attacking Iran’s Nuclear Infrastructure?

By Massimiliano Fiore

It is possible that at some point in the next 15-18 months Israel’s policy-makers and military officials will need to decide whether or not to attack Iran’s nuclear infrastructure. That would certainly be one of the most complicated decisions since the establishment of the State of Israel. What political considerations would influence it? And, what short-term strategic developments would be set in motion either by a nuclear-ready Iran or by an Israeli military strike against Iran’s nuclear installations?

AP Photo/Katsumi Kasahara

Do Arms Races Cause Wars?

By Joseph Maiolo

Ever since Britain’s Foreign Secretary Lord Grey in 1914 declared that the arms race had made war “inevitable”, the question of whether military rivalry causes war has perplexed policymakers and scholars alike. 

US Navy/Michael A. Blaha

Past the Eleventh Hour: US Withdrawal from Iraq

By Katherine Opoka

After eight months of political deadlock, the incumbent Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has been tasked with forming a new government in Iraq. The re-election of the Shiite leader has sparked fresh waves of scepticism internationally as his government’s ability to maintain security in the weakened Iraqi state has been questioned. Following the 7 March 2010 National Elections, the insurgency has persisted, once again threatening to ignite tensions and fuel sectarian conflict across Iraq. As Iraq enters the eleventh hour, what is the future of the fledgling state? 

AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

Terrorism in Mexico, Misperceptions and Misconceptions

By Mauricio Meschoulam

“How can you actually live there?” an American PhD student colleague asked me just a month ago. “Aren’t they shooting each other in the streets all the time?” “Watch out, you might be killed for what you’re writing about”. If outside of Mexico the general perception about the country is like this, inside of our borders the situation is not very different. A recent survey revealed that most people believe that more civilians than cartel members have been killed in the drug war, which is very far from the truth. 

AP Photo/Ibrahim Usta

Was the Mossad Really Behind the Resurgence of Kurdish Terrorism in Turkey?

By Massimiliano Fiore

On 31 May, the same day as the Israeli raid on a Gaza-bound aid flotilla that killed nine Turkish citizens, the Kurdish Workers’ Party (PKK) carried out a rocket attack on a military vehicle near the Iskenderun Naval Base, killing seven Turkish sailors and injuring six others. This coincidence and the fact that it was not a conventional PKK attack, taking place outside its traditional area of operation, raised strong suspicions that the two incidents were related.

AP Photo/Rahmat Gul

Believing in NATO's Victory in Afghanistan

By David Bayon

The war NATO is fighting in Afghanistan is a war of necessity and not of choice. In today’s world, globalization has rendered physical boundaries useless, making our safety dependant on the stability of faraway places.