Europe

Venice Biennale

The Impact of Venice's Biennale

By Antonio de la Hera and Sara Sudetic

Every other year, from early June until late November, Venice is dominated by the Biennale del Arte, commonly described as the "Olympics" of Art. Artists flock to the city, setting up countless official and unofficial pavilions in a variety of locations, from entrepôts to decadent palaces on the Grand Canal.

EU Med Policy

Rethinking the EU's Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Policy

By Massimiliano Fiore

The revolts sweeping through the Mediterranean and the Middle East have exposed the tremendous shortcomings of EU policy towards the region. That policy mistakenly equated short-term stability with deeper and long-term sustainability. In a number of recent speeches, European commissioners have admitted they were wrong to prioritise short-term interests, centred on economic cooperation, security and migration management. 

Sciopero

The Crises in Italian Football and Politics

By Sebastiano Sali

Italy is widely renowned as one of the most beautiful countries in the world. Among the many reasons for this is the colourful world that surrounds football, with all its social traditions and customs. This is a world that can count many fans outside the Boot itself, like Tim Parks, the most famous Englishman who put his interest for Italian football into a book. However, the current temperature of Italian football is way below zero: it is frozen, like a dead body. Whether this has anything to do with global warming or the Berlusconi government, who knows? 

Croatia EU

Croatia: Forging the Road Ahead for the Rest of the Balkans?

By Sara Sudetic

On 25 June 1991, the parliament of Croatia declared its independence from Yugoslavia. Twenty years later, almost to the day, Croatia successfully completed its accession talks with the EU, closing the four outstanding chapters of their negotiations. July 2013 has been set a as a provisional adhesion date. 

Deficit

The Deficit in Current Economic Thinking

By Roland Bensted and Christian Nicholson

The recent financial crisis has stimulated a justifiable interest in the future of developed economies. Since the 2008 Lehman Brothers collapse the economics discipline has been forced to confront its failings. As Dominic Lawson has noted, it has partially undergone a much needed shift towards behavioural economics rather than the cold “rational” mathematical economics that failed so spectacularly. However, as this article describes, there remains enormous scope for a more fundamental rethinking of the political economy of the developed world.

Uk riots

The UK Riots: What Should Be Done?

By Roland Bensted

It is easy, when confronted by the news that groups of mostly young people have been rioting in London and other parts of the country, to dismiss the people involved as feckless opportunists, intent on causing destruction to property and stealing goods from looted shops. It is easy, but simplistic. Likewise, it is too simplistic for those on the left who attribute the serious criminal damage, destruction and threat to life wreaked by the rioters as symptomatic only of government economic policy and welfare cuts, as if the people involved had no agency in the matter.

AP Photo/News International

Putting the Phone-Hacking Scandal into Perspective

By Andrew Gawthorpe

We are now several weeks removed from the unusual, almost mob-driven mentality that gripped the UK at the height of furore over phone hacking. It progressed like a wrecking ball through the pillars of the British establishment, first claiming the country’s most popular Sunday newspaper, then its most prominent policemen, and finally putting a dent in the Prime Minister’s credibility. There was an unpredictable air about the whole affair, with no-one able to foresee what revelations would come next as – ironically enough – the media itself controlled the drip, drip of information and whipped up the frenzy.